Tobias Cramm studied fortepiano with E. Torbianelli and G. Lancaster in Basel/CH (Schola Cantorum) and Canberra/Australia and holds a Bachelor of Arts in musicology and social sciences from the university of Basel. He has been involved in exploring partimento-based approaches to improvisation and composing as a performer, researcher, and teacher since 2010 when he started to work with Alma Deutscher (b. 2005).

Ewald Demeyere (ewalddemeyere.be) is a harpsichordist, conductor, music theorist and professor. He believes that the conveying of the emotional contents of a composition is a performing artist’s most important task. Since each period has its own specifics to realise this, however, Demeyere intends to combine emotion with historically informed performance practice in such a way to obtain as captivating an interpretation as possible.

His research, which, among others, resulted in a PhD and the publication of his book Johann Sebastian Bach's Art of Fugue-Performance Practice Based on German Eighteenth-Century Theory (Leuven University Press, 2013) and his article On Fedele Fenaroli’s Pedagogy: An Update (Eighteenth-Century Music 15/2, Cambridge University Press, 2018), is never an end in itself but always has to serve the eloquence of the musical performance. As a performing artist, he has taken part in more than 100 CD recordings, many of which with solo and chamber music repertoire (working with, among others, Barthold Kuijken). Demeyere leads the section of Baroque music at the Conservatory of Namur, where he also teaches harpsichord, counterpoint, partimento and continuo.

Lydia Carlisi was born in Manchester (UK), but grew up un Italy. She studied in Rome (Università di Roma 2/Tor Vergata) completing in 2010 a Bachelor Thesis on Leonardo Leo's Partimenti under the direction of Professor Giorgio Sanguinetti. In 2015 she completed a Master in Music Theory in the class of Prof. Dr. Ludwig Holtmeier at the Hochschule für Musik Freiburg (DE) with a thesis on Gaspare Selvaggi's «Trattato di armonia» (1823). During this time she was awarded a DAAD scholarship. Since October 2015 she teaches Music Theory at the HfM Freiburg and since May 2016 she is doctoral candidate at the HfM Freiburg and active co-worker at the Hochschule der Künste Bern for the «Neapolitan Canon» Project.

As a musicologist and music theorist, Peter has specialized in aural training pedagogy, counterpoint pedagogy and historic improvisation and composition. He studied Music Pedagogy (Master Exam, 5 years) at Brabant Conservatory in Tilburg, Master in Musicology at the University of Utrecht and Master in Music Theory (MA) at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. Peter's PhD dissertation Counterpoint and Partimento: Methods of Teaching Composition in Late Eighteenth-Century Naples (Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, Uppsala, 2015) highlights the practical teaching strategies at the Neapolitan conservatories during the late eighteenth century. In 1995, Peter co-founded the Gotland School of Music Composition, where he has been teaching Music Theory until 2014.

His current postdoctoral project 'The Improvised Fugue in Germany and Italy between 1670 and 1760' is hosted by the University of Leuven, and will investigate how organists were trained to acquire skills in fugal improvisation. Various kinds of short-hand notation in Italian and German sources from between 1670 and 1760 will be systematically investigated. This project is funded by the Swedish Research Council (July 2016 – July 2019).

Since the fall of 2017 Peter has joined the Department of Music Theory at the Norwegian Academy of Music in Oslo, where he has been appointed associate professor of Music Theory (www.nmh.no).

Personal homepage: www.vantour.se


Tobias Cramm
studied fortepiano with E. Torbianelli and G. Lancaster in Basel/CH (Schola Cantorum) and Canberra/Australia and holds a Bachelor of Arts in musicology and social sciences from the university of Basel. He has been involved in exploring partimento-based approaches to improvisation and composing as a performer, researcher, and teacher since 2010 when he started to work with Alma Deutscher (b. 2005).


Ewald Demeyere
(ewalddemeyere.be) is a harpsichordist, conductor, music theorist and professor. He believes that the conveying of the emotional contents of a composition is a performing artist’s most important task. Since each period has its own specifics to realise this, however, Demeyere intends to combine emotion with historically informed performance practice in such a way to obtain as captivating an interpretation as possible.

His research, which, among others, resulted in a PhD and the publication of his book Johann Sebastian Bach's Art of Fugue-Performance Practice Based on German Eighteenth-Century Theory (Leuven University Press, 2013) and his article On Fedele Fenaroli’s Pedagogy: An Update (Eighteenth-Century Music 15/2, Cambridge University Press, 2018), is never an end in itself but always has to serve the eloquence of the musical performance. As a performing artist, he has taken part in more than 100 CD recordings, many of which with solo and chamber music repertoire (working with, among others, Barthold Kuijken). Demeyere leads the section of Baroque music at the Conservatory of Namur, where he also teaches harpsichord, counterpoint, partimento and continuo.


Lydia Carlisi
was born in Manchester (UK), but grew up un Italy. She studied in Rome (Università di Roma 2/Tor Vergata) completing in 2010 a Bachelor Thesis on Leonardo Leo's Partimenti under the direction of Professor Giorgio Sanguinetti. In 2015 she completed a Master in Music Theory in the class of Prof. Dr. Ludwig Holtmeier at the Hochschule für Musik Freiburg (DE) with a thesis on Gaspare Selvaggi's «Trattato di armonia» (1823). During this time she was awarded a DAAD scholarship. Since October 2015 she teaches Music Theory at the HfM Freiburg and since May 2016 she is doctoral candidate at the HfM Freiburg and active co-worker at the Hochschule der Künste Bern for the «Neapolitan Canon» Project.

As a musicologist and music theorist, Peter van Tour has specialized in aural training pedagogy, counterpoint pedagogy and historic improvisation and composition. He studied Music Pedagogy (Master Exam, 5 years) at Brabant Conservatory in Tilburg, Master in Musicology at the University of Utrecht and Master in Music Theory (MA) at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. Peter's PhD dissertation Counterpoint and Partimento: Methods of Teaching Composition in Late Eighteenth-Century Naples (Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, Uppsala, 2015) highlights the practical teaching strategies at the Neapolitan conservatories during the late eighteenth century. In 1995, Peter co-founded the Gotland School of Music Composition, where he has been teaching Music Theory until 2014.

His current postdoctoral project 'The Improvised Fugue in Germany and Italy between 1670 and 1760' is hosted by the University of Leuven, and will investigate how organists were trained to acquire skills in fugal improvisation. Various kinds of short-hand notation in Italian and German sources from between 1670 and 1760 will be systematically investigated. This project is funded by the Swedish Research Council (July 2016 – July 2019).

Since the fall of 2017 Peter has joined the Department of Music Theory at the Norwegian Academy of Music in Oslo, where he has been appointed associate professor of Music Theory (www.nmh.no).

Personal homepage: www.vantour.se